thingsorganizedneatly:

Daniel Bejar, Visual Topography of a Generation Gap
via

thingsorganizedneatly:

Daniel Bejar, Visual Topography of a Generation Gap

via

(Source: danielbejar.com, via merrhhhk)

hey friends it’s been a while

nat403:

Ayumee-aawach Oomama-mowan: Speaking to Their Mother by Rebecca Belmore.
A huge wooden megaphone which she travelled across Canada with to bring the Native Peoples of many nations the chance to talk to their mother, Earth.

xamounts:

As an employee of a notorious art dealer whose roots are embedded elsewhere, I feel a responsibility to bring awareness to this case. This is wildly important!

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE September 14, 2010
Vancouver

On Saturday September 11, 2010 Anishnaabe artist Rebecca Belmore performed her new work WORTH (– Statement of Defense) outside the Vancouver Art Gallery (VAG). A small audience of artists and curious onlookers gathered as witnesses to the performance. (Belmore also donated an earlier work, Wild, (2001) to the VAG.)

‘Witness’ is appropriate in this context, as is the setting of the VAG, a former courthouse building. The performance and the video memorializing it, are Belmore’s response to law suits filed in the Ontario courts involving her former art dealer, Pari Nadimi of Toronto. The work demonstrates the artist’s public commitment to vigorously defending herself, her art practice and more broadly, the rights of all artists against those who seek to exploit them.

WORTH (– Statement of Defense), may be viewed at:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cv9DfVAzok4

Belmore is an acclaimed artist with an international reputation. She has practiced in various media, including performance, sculpture, video and photography for over 20 years. Her work has been featured in numerous exhibitions nationally and internationally since the 1980s, most notably, representing Canada at the biennials held in Venice, Sydney and Havana. She also holds an honorary doctorate from the Ontario College of Art (now OCAD). In spite of the artist’s significant and broadly-recognized contributions to contemporary art practice, this ongoing litigation, threatens Belmore’s future.

WORTH (– Statement of Defense), which features the sign, “I AM WORTH MORE THAN ONE MILLION DOLLARS TO MY PEOPLE,” speaks directly to the value of artists and art production in the 21st Century. The sign also references the amount of ‘damages’ being claimed by Pari Nadimi, an amount the dealer claims she has ‘invested’ in Belmore’s career. Nadimi’s allegations are unproven.

The legal battle began over 4 years ago, when Belmore, after deciding to leave the Pari Nadimi Gallery, requested the return of her artworks, related documentation and the payment (and an accounting) for artwork sold by the dealer. These basic, legal rights are still being violated. Belmore recognizes the importance of the case for herself and others: “If Pari Nadimi is successful in this claim against me, it would mean no artist would ever be free to choose to leave. Artists would be slaves to their galleries. This is a horrible precedent.”

Litigation is expensive. Belmore needs to raise funds to travel to Toronto and to continue to defend herself in this action. While claiming to be impecunious and unable to pay, Nadimi has hired a top Bay Street law firm, Heenan Blaikie. Ironically, the firm’s founder, Roy Heenan, has been a consistent supporter of Canadian art.

WORTH (– Statement of Defense), is therefore an appeal to the public to defend and support “the Artist” and the rights of artists to decide how and where their work is presented. Organizations such as CARFAC and others do valuable work to create conditions to ensure rights are protected and respected. However, they lack the mandate and resources to support individual artists in these cases.

Call To Action: A growing number of prominent Canadians in the art world have voiced their support for Belmore, see our website or Facebook for these names. In addition to the moral support, Belmore is seeking donations to defend herself in this litigation.

To support her and artists right generally on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Rebecca-Belmore-Legal-Fund/156231281070631?ref=mf

(c/o Glenn Alteen)

vicemag:

This Guy Spends His Entire Life in Front of a Webcam
Ari Kivikangas spends his entire life in front of a webcam. But unlike most vloggers devoted to sharing their lives with people who couldn’t care less, he doesn’t often do very much; there are no Kid Cudi ukelele covers or desperate pleas for followers, and at no point has he broken into a comedy routine.
That’s his first selling point. The second is that Ari—or “Cyberman”, as he’s called his Ustream show—claims to be online 24/7, except for brief gaps when he’s picking up his epilepsy medicine or, as he told me in an email, when he’s “getting some pussy (not often) or masturbating!”
What Ari does is called “life-casting”, which should be pretty self-explanatory, but basically involves live-streaming every single thing you do, like a self-enforced Truman Show with a fraction of the viewers. There’s something kind of fascinating about that; it takes a very specific type of confidence to not a give a shit about strangers watching you sleep.
So to find out a little more about his life online, I Skyped with Ari from his home in Finland. 
VICE: Hi Ari. So when did you start livestreaming your life?Ari Kivikangas: I started about four years ago. I was stuck at home for three months and had a lot of time on my hands but nothing to do, so I started doing this. I’m epileptic and I don’t work any more, so I’m always at home.  
And you’ve spent all of your time online throughout those four years?Yes, I’m online 24/7.
Have you always been quite an open person? Because letting people into your life to this extent seems like a pretty big step to take.It’s a very big step, yeah, because I say exactly what I’m thinking at all times. I also tell everyone pretty much everything about my own personal history—not everything, but most things.

Ari, showing viewers his setup
Give me a sample.For example, I told my audience that I gave a man a blowjob. I’m bisexual. He came to see me, so I gave him a blowjob.
On webcam? No, not on webcam. I’ve masturbated on webcam before, though.
Regularly?No, just once, a year ago. That wasn’t cool; it was really stupid. People were not cool about it.
Why do think that is? I had a really negative reaction to it, but I don’t care about what they say any more—I have a choice as to when I masturbate. 
Do you ever go offline?Only when I’m picking up my medication or when I masturbate, but I can do that in other ways, like in my trousers.
Continue

vicemag:

This Guy Spends His Entire Life in Front of a Webcam

Ari Kivikangas spends his entire life in front of a webcam. But unlike most vloggers devoted to sharing their lives with people who couldn’t care less, he doesn’t often do very much; there are no Kid Cudi ukelele covers or desperate pleas for followers, and at no point has he broken into a comedy routine.

That’s his first selling point. The second is that Ari—or “Cyberman”, as he’s called his Ustream show—claims to be online 24/7, except for brief gaps when he’s picking up his epilepsy medicine or, as he told me in an email, when he’s “getting some pussy (not often) or masturbating!”

What Ari does is called “life-casting”, which should be pretty self-explanatory, but basically involves live-streaming every single thing you do, like a self-enforced Truman Show with a fraction of the viewers. There’s something kind of fascinating about that; it takes a very specific type of confidence to not a give a shit about strangers watching you sleep.

So to find out a little more about his life online, I Skyped with Ari from his home in Finland. 

VICE: Hi Ari. So when did you start livestreaming your life?
Ari Kivikangas:
 I started about four years ago. I was stuck at home for three months and had a lot of time on my hands but nothing to do, so I started doing this. I’m epileptic and I don’t work any more, so I’m always at home.  

And you’ve spent all of your time online throughout those four years?
Yes, I’m online 24/7.

Have you always been quite an open person? Because letting people into your life to this extent seems like a pretty big step to take.
It’s a very big step, yeah, because I say exactly what I’m thinking at all times. I also tell everyone pretty much everything about my own personal history—not everything, but most things.

Ari, showing viewers his setup

Give me a sample.
For example, I told my audience that I gave a man a blowjob. I’m bisexual. He came to see me, so I gave him a blowjob.

On webcam? 
No, not on webcam. I’ve masturbated on webcam before, though.

Regularly?
No, just once, a year ago. That wasn’t cool; it was really stupid. People were not cool about it.

Why do think that is? 
I had a really negative reaction to it, but I don’t care about what they say any more—I have a choice as to when I masturbate. 

Do you ever go offline?
Only when I’m picking up my medication or when I masturbate, but I can do that in other ways, like in my trousers.

Continue

vicemag:

There’s Still Something Mythical About Small-Town Finland 

In 1835, the Finnish linguist Elias Lönnrot published the Kalevala, a compilation of traditional epic poetry. In his home country, the Kalevala is now considered to be one of the most important works of literature of all time. I guess you could say that the Kalevala is to Finland what the Iliad is to the rest of the world.

Five photographers traveled to Kainuu in Northeast Finland, the birthplace of the Kalevala, and explored the mythology through contemporary photography. I called up one of the guys, Aapo, to chat about the project.

VICE: Hey, Aapo. Tell me why you got interested in the Kalevala.
Aapo Huhta: You know Greek mythology, right? The Kalevala is like the Finnish version. It’s a collection of stories from a long time ago. They’re like folklore stories, about the beginning of the world and major things like that. Since one man collected the stories in the Kainuu area, our project is based around that. These days, things are changing between cities and the countryside. In Helsinki we have a routine kind of life but in the countryside life is, in a way, going backwards. So we wanted to explore that while having these old stories about Finland in mind. But it’s not really documentary-based work. Part of it is about the group experience of Kainuu but at the same time everyone had the freedom to explore the place in their own way.

Photo by Maria Gallen-Kallela

Is this mythology something that Finnish kids get taught about in school?
Yes, everybody touches upon these stories at school. But generally, people aren’t very familiar with them any more. I mean, I knew about them from school and now I’ve learned more about them through this project.

What’s happening in the Kainuu region at the moment?
I think the same thing is happening in Finland as in Sweden, that people are moving away from the countryside. There aren’t that many young people living there any more. Old people are staying there but there aren’t many social services left, unfortunately.

Continue

elsebas:

Missing the Finns already!!!

l-meanwhile-in-canada:

Toronto’s last roll - Get the fuck out - part 2

come back pls

l-meanwhile-in-canada:

Toronto’s last roll - Get the fuck out - Part 1

the ocad registrar’s office and i

the ocad registrar’s office and i

(Source: fatmagic, via neepsterdoofus)

(Source: rory-williams, via deeathxgrip)

lazompire:

Day 1342
Congrats to all my OCADU peeps! Fantastical show this year! SO PROUD OF Y’ALL!
ft. raaaymond thesuperstitious chemis-tree

lazompire:

Day 1342

Congrats to all my OCADU peeps! Fantastical show this year! SO PROUD OF Y’ALL!

ft. raaaymond thesuperstitious chemis-tree